At the end of the day…

The excitement and drudgery, accomplishment and pleasures of our everyday- the scheduled and the unexpected, emails and to-do lists, running after (and waiting for) planes, trains, and automobiles, the schlepping of the groceries while holding a phone to one ear and trying to sincerely listen.  The attempting to keep up with current events, authors, catch phrases, lyrics. The feeding of your inner political beast, participating in community programs, supporting local agriculture…dairy…meat…art.  All while knowing that you should be trying to do more yoga, maybe even meditating, adopting a dog, and of course, taking a moment to stop and smell the (corner store?) roses…

Amidst all of these things that we do to get by with a little sanity and style, we seek moments of peace.  If not for a daily indulgence or two- be it taking the time to breathe in the sweet blossomy fuzz of summer’s first peach, or turning off the mind and relishing in the coziness of a warm creamy latte, what are we doing here? That old adage, life is too short- it’s really real. So, at the end of the day we celebrate with friends, family, strangers, and sometimes the sweet company of ourselves.

When we do this, why not imbibe in something ridiculous and lovely? Match a wine to your mood. On a quirky day when you realize that everything is connected in a very I Heart Huckabees sort of way, pour yourself a glass of Domaine Pascal Pibaleau’s La Perlette, a charming sparkling made from a grape called Grolleau- little-known and typical of France’s Loire region. Feeling light and free? A bottle of Jean Folliard’s Morgon Cote du Py will solidify the feeling. A Zinfandel from one of my favorite Napa Valley producers, Storybook Mountain, may cater to a more gregarious mood, its transparently hedonistic qualities offering instant gratification. Need something to sip with a savory slow-roasted meal and your Autumn sweater?  Cozy up with a wine made from one of southern Italy’s most capable grapes, Aglianico (thought of by some as the “Nebbiolo of the South” for its ability to render broodingly tannic wines worthy of age).  There are numerous talented producers of Aglianico, including Donato D’Angelo, who has forged quite a path for the grape in his region at the base of Mt. Vulture, an extinct volcano.  On laundry day chill down a bottle of Pierre Boniface’s current vintage of Vin de Savoie. You will feel utterly drunk on the idea of the fresh Alpine air where its Jacquère grapes are grown. And isn’t utterly drunk just the point?

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